Intel Pentium Gold G5600 Review

Entry-level desktop processor released in 2018 with 2 cores and 4 threads. With base clock at 3.9GHz, max speed at 3.9GHz, and a 54W power rating. Pentium Gold G5600 is based on the Coffee Lake 14nm family and part of the Pentium Gold series.
Price 41.3%
Speed 70%
Productivity 52%
Gaming 79%
Category Desktop
Target entry-level
Socket Compatibility LGA1151
Integrated Graphics Intel UHD Graphics 630
Cooler Included No
Overclock Potential 0 %
Year 2018 Model
Price 93 USD
Number of Cores 2 Cores
Number of Threads 4 Threads
Core Frequency 3.9 GHz
Boost Frequency 3.9 GHz
Max Stable Overclock 3.9 GHz
Power Consumption 54 W
Manufacturing Process 14 nm
L3 Cache 4 MB
Maximum Supported Memory 64 GB
Price-Value Score 41.3 %
Speed Score 70 %
Productivity Score 52 %
Gaming Score 79 %
Max 1080p Bottleneck 50.3 %
Max 1440p Bottleneck 25.2 %
Max 4K Bottleneck 12.6 %
Overall Score 35/100

The Pentium Gold G5600 is one of Intel's entry-level Desktop processors. It was released in 2018 with 2 cores and 4 threads. With base clock at 3.9GHz, max speed at 3.9GHz, and a 54W power rating. The Pentium Gold G5600 is based on the Coffee Lake 14nm family and is part of the Pentium Gold series.

Now, we're asking ourselves whether or not the Intel Pentium Gold G5600 finally dethrones the A6-7480 as the de facto ruler of the mainstream processors. Ultimately, it depends: the Pentium Gold G5600 doesn't reach the same single-core performance as AMD, but we're starting to see more games adopt multi-threaded CPUs, so that doesn't matter as much.

We covered the deep dive details of the Coffee Lake chip design in our Intel Pentium Gold G5620 and Pentium Gold G5500 review, so head there for more information on the Pentium Gold G5600's architecture, which is identical to the Pentium Gold G5500.

As the higher-priced version of the Pentium Gold G5500, the Pentium Gold G5600 has higher base and Boost frequencies of 3.9 and 3.9 GHz, respectively. That's an increase in base frequency and a bump to boost clocks, but the real advantage should lay in the higher Package Power Tracking (PPT) envelope, which is a measurement of the maximum amount of power delivered to the socket. The Pentium Gold G5500's PPT tops out at 54W, while the motherboard can pump up to 142W to the Pentium Gold G5600 at peak performance. That opens up much more aggressive boost behavior, on both single and multiple cores, that could widen the performance gap beyond what we see on the spec sheet.

But, like most humans, if you do things other than gaming, the Pentium Gold G5600 offers a better mixture of performance in single- and multi-threaded applications. The Pentium Gold G5600 offers twice the threads of the price-comparable A6-7480, and it wields them to great effect in threaded workloads. As such, rendering and encoding remain a strong suit of the Pentium Gold chips, and Intel's improvements to AVX throughput have yielded impressive results.

The Intel Pentium Gold G5600 seems to be a decent performing chip that is readily available for $93 at your favorite retailer. The main competition for this processor is the A6-7480 2-Core unlocked desktop processor with Radeon R5 (on die) graphics ($74.13 shipped).

If extended overclocking and boost frequencies are trivial matters to you, Intel also offers the Pentium Gold G5500 at $75. It’s still outfitted with 2-cores and 4-threads, but clocks in at a slower 3.8GHz and maxes out at only 3.8GHz.

With Pentium Gold, Intel continues to innovate on its new architecture and 14nm process. Like Pentium Gold, Intel has engineered Pentium Gold to operate on a LGA1151 chipset with all the modern amenities of computing. This includes support for DDR4 RAM, the fastest NVMe SSDs and Thunderbolt 3 ports.

That said, to squeeze out all the potential of this surprisingly potent entry-level chip, you’ll want (and need) to splurge on an enthusiast-grade Z270, Z370, Z390 motherboard.

Fresh from a successful roll-out of mainstream Pentium Gold CPUs, Intel's attack on AMD now extends down into the entry-level with its Pentium Gold G5600 processors, which the company is making available as of May 2018.

Which GPU to Pick for Intel Pentium Gold G5600

Below is a comparison of all graphics cards average FPS performance (using an average of 80+ games at ultra quality settings), combined with the Intel Pentium Gold G5600.

GPU Price Cost/Frame Avg 1080p Avg 1440p Avg 4K
NVIDIA TITAN RTX 24GB $2,499 $26.6 93.8 FPS
107.5 FPS
75.5 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11GB $1,299 $14.2 91.3 FPS
104.7 FPS
73.4 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER 8GB $699 $8.4 82.8 FPS
94.1 FPS
65.6 FPS
NVIDIA TITAN V 12GB $2,999 $37.8 79.4 FPS
91.1 FPS
65.2 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 8GB $699 $8.9 78.3 FPS
88 FPS
60.9 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB $759 $10.3 73.4 FPS
83.9 FPS
58.6 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8GB $499 $6.8 72.9 FPS
81 FPS
56.4 FPS
NVIDIA TITAN Xp 12GB $1,199 $16.7 72 FPS
81 FPS
57.8 FPS
AMD Radeon VII 16GB $699 $9.7 72 FPS
80.5 FPS
55.2 FPS
AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT 8GB $399 $5.7 70.1 FPS
78.3 FPS
53.6 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 8GB $499 $7.2 69.1 FPS
75.7 FPS
53.4 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER 8GB $400 $6.1 65.4 FPS
70.5 FPS
48.8 FPS
AMD Radeon RX 5700 8GB $349 $5.4 64.2 FPS
71.8 FPS
49.1 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 8GB $499 $8 62.3 FPS
68.6 FPS
47.1 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 6GB $350 $5.7 61.6 FPS
64.8 FPS
44.1 FPS
AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT 6GB $279 $4.6 60.6 FPS
67.2 FPS
45.8 FPS
AMD Radeon R9 295X2 4GB $1,499 $25.7 58.4 FPS
63.4 FPS
46.3 FPS
AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 8GB $499 $8.6 58.3 FPS
65.2 FPS
44.5 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8GB $409 $7.1 57.8 FPS
63.6 FPS
43.5 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN X 12GB $999 $17.8 56.2 FPS
61.1 FPS
41.9 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6GB $279 $5.1 54.9 FPS
60.5 FPS
41.4 FPS
AMD Radeon RX Vega 56 8GB $399 $7.3 54.6 FPS
60.9 FPS
41.7 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 8GB $399 $7.5 53.2 FPS
58 FPS
39.4 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER 6GB $229 $4.4 51.8 FPS
57.1 FPS
39.1 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 Ti 6GB $649 $13.3 48.9 FPS
53.5 FPS
36.6 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 6GB $220 $4.5 48.8 FPS
53.7 FPS
36.7 FPS
AMD Radeon RX 590 8GB $279 $6 46.3 FPS
49.5 FPS
33.1 FPS
AMD Radeon R9 FURY X 4GB $649 $14.6 44.4 FPS
50.9 FPS
35.7 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 SUPER 4GB $160 $3.8 42.5 FPS
46.6 FPS
31.9 FPS
AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT 8GB 8GB $199 $4.7 42.1 FPS
45 FPS
30 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 4GB $549 $13.1 41.9 FPS
45.4 FPS
31.3 FPS
AMD Radeon RX 580 8GB $229 $5.6 41 FPS
43.8 FPS
29.1 FPS
AMD Radeon R9 Nano 4GB $649 $16.1 40.4 FPS
45.5 FPS
31.8 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN BLACK 6GB $999 $25.5 39.2 FPS
42.1 FPS
30.2 FPS
AMD Radeon R9 FURY 4GB $549 $14.4 38.2 FPS
42.8 FPS
29.5 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB $254 $6.7 38 FPS
41 FPS
28.1 FPS
AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT 4GB 4GB $169 $4.5 37.7 FPS
40.4 FPS
26.9 FPS
AMD Radeon R9 390X 8GB $429 $11.7 36.7 FPS
41.1 FPS
28.5 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060 3GB 3GB $170 $4.7 36.1 FPS
39 FPS
26.7 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970 4GB $329 $9.3 35.5 FPS
37.9 FPS
27 FPS
AMD Radeon RX 480 8GB $400 $11.6 34.5 FPS
38.2 FPS
26.8 FPS
AMD Radeon R9 390 8GB $329 $9.6 34.3 FPS
37.5 FPS
24.5 FPS
AMD Radeon RX 570 4GB $169 $5 33.9 FPS
37 FPS
24.8 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 4GB $149 $4.6 32.4 FPS
35.3 FPS
24.1 FPS
AMD Radeon RX 470 4GB $179 $5.9 30.2 FPS
33.2 FPS
22.6 FPS
AMD Radeon R9 380X 4GB $229 $9 25.4 FPS
27.6 FPS
19.2 FPS
AMD Radeon R9 285 2GB $249 $10.9 22.8 FPS
24.9 FPS
16.3 FPS
AMD Radeon R9 380 2GB $199 $8.8 22.6 FPS
24.6 FPS
16.3 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti 4GB $169 $7.6 22.3 FPS
24.4 FPS
16.6 FPS
AMD Radeon R9 280 3GB $279 $12.6 22.1 FPS
24.3 FPS
15.6 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 960 2GB $199 $9.1 21.8 FPS
23.6 FPS
15.9 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 3GB $169 $8.9 19 FPS
20.5 FPS
13.8 FPS
AMD Radeon RX 560 4GB $99 $5.6 17.6 FPS
18.8 FPS
12.6 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 950 2GB $159 $9.2 17.2 FPS
18.4 FPS
12.8 FPS
AMD Radeon R7 370 2GB $149 $8.8 16.9 FPS
17.3 FPS
12.1 FPS
AMD Radeon R7 265 2GB $149 $8.9 16.8 FPS
16.7 FPS
11.8 FPS
AMD Radeon RX 460 4GB $140 $9 15.5 FPS
16.6 FPS
11.3 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti 2GB $149 $9.9 15 FPS
14.3 FPS
10.1 FPS
AMD Radeon RX 550 2GB $79 $6.4 12.3 FPS
13.2 FPS
8.8 FPS
NVIDIA GeForce GT 1030 2GB $79 $6.8 11.7 FPS
12.5 FPS
8.2 FPS

Related Discussions

M
mikeatwar July 21, 2020

Help a noob (RX 5600 XT) games crashing

Hi , to keep it short ill summarize my situation :

-> Upgraded the whole PC but not the SSD and HDD .

-> New CPU new Mainboard new GPU new PSU

-> Switched from a GTX 1050ti with an i7 to RX 5600XT and Ryzen 5 3600

-> Installed the latest driver center from AMD website, installed latest drivers for chipset from website

-> Made windows updates (win 10 pro x64)

-> Reboot serval times

-> Almost every game is silently closing when entering the game from menu or even at menu.

No logs no error message.


Now i read about driver issues and i wonder which driver (propably WHQL) i should install and HOW.

There are games like Guildwars 1 and 2 that are running good but at low FPS and also the computer feels more laggy than before with my previous setup speaking about loading times and switching between apps and games


Computer Type: Desktop

GPU: ASUS ROG STRIX - RX 5600XT

CPU: Ryzen 5 3600 stock

Motherboard: MSI b450 gaming max plus

RAM: 32GB Vengeance RGB 2x 16

PSU: bequiet 500w v11

Case: sharkoon pure steel

Operating System & Version: win 10 x 64 pro latest

GPU Drivers: latest

Chipset Drivers: latest

Background Applications: ASUS gpu tweak II

P
Perpetratorn July 23, 2020

Do you have more than one screen plugged in? I spent hours pulling my hair why Monster Hunter didn't want to start, the window just opened and closed without any errors or anything at all. Looked through the event viewer like 15x looking for any trace of errors... But no... Figured it was Denuvo messing with me (I did not have Steam running, *wink wink*) and that I was f*ed.

But no, finally I tried just disabling my second screen (my TV) which wasn't even turned on, and hadn't been for at least 12 hours. Ah, suddenly it worked just fine, not a trace of a problem. I guess it had something to do with conflicting resolution instructions or something, but man, really spent hours trying to fix this and it was just a damned mouse click away the whole time.

M
mikeatwar July 24, 2020

yeah i have 3 monitors 2x 16:9 and 1x 21:9 screens.

But its working now after i rollback to driver 20.2 and updated my bios

T
TitanTigger July 21, 2020

If you upgraded the cpu gpu motherboard etc you will almost deffinetly have to reinstall windows to have everything work. So id backup your data and hit reset this pc in the windows settings. Your power supply should be fine

M
mikeatwar July 22, 2020

I thought about this too but i have tons of software ( VST Plugins and stuff) installed so i wanted to keep all that because a reinstall of my system would take at least 2 free evenings.. But i guess after i update my BIOS and dowgrade the driver to 20.2.2 if that wont help i will wipe my system .


The PSU is fine ? everyone keeps telling me different things about the 500w PSU , but if it was the PSU then why just the game closes ?

C
CMDR_Cortex July 21, 2020

Did you remove your old Drivers via the DDU (Display Driver Uninstaller)? This is recommended since updating without using DDU first might cause problems.

Also your PSU might just be a little too weak, although 500W just might be enough, (not an expert though). 500W should be fine for your 5600xt, i misread it as 5700xt first.

Since you updated your OS try to check for any corruptions via System file Checker

M
mikeatwar July 22, 2020

but if it was the PSU then why just the game closes ?

No , i did not know about that software i will use it this evening and reinstall the driver but a WHQL one no the latest and test that .

but if it was the PSU then why just the game closes ?

S
Slrnt August 06, 2020

Help! Rx 5600 xt or RTX 2060?

I can't decide wich GPU i have to buy :(

I can get the RTX 2060 more cheaper than the RX 5600 xt but also I can get the RX 5600 XT more cheaper than the RTX 2060 Super.

Wich one should I go for? Sorry for grammatical errors, I am Argentine :)

H
hitzuki688 August 06, 2020

If you have tight budget both of them great cards and nvidia has dsll 2.0 but if you can save some money choose 5700 & 5700xt and have fun with low price 2070 without rtx.

C
chronisaurous August 04, 2020

My friend has been extremely generous and given me a Ryzen 5600 and a Gigabyte RX 5600 XT! I need a bit of help with a build - I have a bit of an idea of what I want to do but I haven't built a PC in years, a bit of help would be awesome!

I have limited money for now, so I'm thinking of using the stock CPU cooler until I can afford an AIO. I also have a couple of older 8GB sticks of ram that I can use as well. I'll probably wait until I can afford both and upgrade later.

As far as the case, I'm going to go the Lian Li PC-O11, cause I love it. Power supply, I'm thinking a corsair RM 650X.

I'm mainly unsure about the motherboard and fans - for the motherboard I was just looking at the Gigabyte B550 Aorus Pro, but I'm definitely not set in stone yet. I think I want PCI-E 4 and also I need USB-C for the case. I need good audio as well but as far as I can tell, pretty much all motherboards this price will have good audio.

I really have no idea about fans - if possible, I would like to get a fan setup that will be fine when I eventually get an AIO but also be fine with the stock cooler for now. A local shop currently has 20% off all be quiet! fans, but I really don't know what fans to get! 9 fans would be pretty cool, I would love to do that.

If I'm forgetting anything, please let me know! I would love some help, please let me know what you guys would do!

Cheers

edit - I forgot to mention that I have all of my storage! 2 SSDs and HDDS as well if I want them. Also, I'm in Australia. The only price here to really mention would be the mobo - around the same price as the B550 Aorus Pro is affordable for me.

N
NintendoNoNo August 04, 2020

A Ryzen 5600?? Wow, ask your friend if COVID is gone in the future because he somehow got a CPU that hasn't even been announced yet! (kidding)

In all seriousness, make a PCPartPicker page for everything and post it here. It makes it easier to review build plans.

C
chronisaurous August 04, 2020

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/KTF8p8

Here's the list of things I had going in my head but now I'm getting incompatibility messages. As far as fans go, I really don't know what I need.

R
roblin_the_goblin August 08, 2020

RX 5600 XT: Pixellated, garbage graphics. Please help!

Hi,

So I recently built a PC with an RX 5600 XT and it seems fine for games. However I am finding that the quality when playing video is atrociously bad, worse than my 8 year old laptop.

The main problem is that dark colours/blacks become super pixellated and blurry, to the point of being unwatchable in very darek scenes. I tried to get some screenshots, see here: https://imgur.com/a/M7zYbml .

Strangely I have not noticed a problem when gaming, only watching Youtube videos and movies. I have ruled out the monitor as the issue persists with several monitors I have tried, and I don;t get the problem when connecting the laptop.

Has anybody encountered anything similar?

Y
Ybashb August 08, 2020

Maybe plug the monitor into a different gpu port

Y
Ybashb August 08, 2020

Also, use DDU to completely wipe and reinstall the drivers.

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Critics Reviews

The Pentium Gold G5600 also comes equipped with Intel's widely used UHD Graphics 630 integrated graphics silicon, which features 24 execution units (EUs) and is clocked at 1.1GHz.
The Pentium Gold G5600 also comes equipped with Intel's widely used UHD Graphics 630 integrated graphics silicon, which features 24 execution units (EUs) and is clocked at 1.1GHz.
Intel's Pentium Gold G5600 includes on-die UHD Graphics 630, while the G5400 utilizes UHD Graphics 610. The former is composed of 24 execution units in what is referred to as a GT2 configuration ...
Intel's Pentium Gold G5600 processor features HyperThreading, which turns its two cores into four threads. The result is one of the most affordable entry-level CPUs that is fit for gaming. Tough competition comes in form of the AMD Ryzen 2200G, which is similarly priced, but offers four real cores.
In games, a $100 Ryzen 3 2200G trailed Intel's Pentium Gold G5600 just barely at its stock settings. But overclocking the Ryzen made it competitive with the $117 Core i3-8100.
Intel’s Pentium Gold G5600 (list-priced at $75 to $82, per Intel) is one of the company’s fastest Pentium desktop processors, as well as one of its snappiest dual-core products. Equipped with Hyper-Threading technology so it can handle four processing threads at once and a perky 3.9GHz clock speed, does the Pentium Gold have what it […]
Intel’s Pentium Gold G5600 (list-priced at $75 to $82, per Intel) is one of the company’s fastest Pentium desktop processors, as well as one of its snappiest dual-core products. Equipped with Hyper-Threading technology so it can handle four processing threads at once and a perky 3.9GHz clock speed, does the Pentium Gold have what it […]

Related Comments

T
th0r July 05, 2019
Upgrade cpu or gpu?
So I THINK I fell into a trap. In a pc magazine, i think it was maximum pc oct. 2018 issue, they had a $500 budget pc building guide and I followed it to a tee and bought all the parts knowing all I wanted to do was mainly play RTS's and MMO's. But within that pc build was a non-overclockable compatible motherboard(B360M D3H). It supports coffee lake cpu's as far as I know.

The thing is, i'm now thinking about upgrading a part in the rig and I don't know which one would benefit me more. Here are my current specs:

intel pentium gold G5600 3.9GHz 2 cores(4 threads)
Nvidia GTX1050(non-ti version)
8GB DDR4 ram
Windows 10 64-bit
B360M D3H motherboard


Any help with deciding what to do would help alot. Also, if upgrading my cpu is the best option, do I upgrade it to a non-k intel cpu that goes with the current mobo or do I buy a K series cpu for the sake of higher base clock frequencies and futureproofing for possible future overclocking?
R
Rdslw August 01, 2017
start the games and check cpu/gpu load in task manager.
1050 TI can do a lot so I suppose cpu will be 100%.
if so, grab anything i5 8400/i7 8600 or k versions.
they will work you just would not be able to OVERCLOCK above predefined 4.70 GHz (people can usually get 5.0 which end up in ~5% boost)
go for whatever have best deal right now.
for GPU I suggest going 2up at minimum so 1080 OR 2060, best to wait for amd to realase their thing, more "deals" should appear then.